Poetry

Light Steps

Jeredith Merrin

after Baudelaire’s "Recuillement"

Sorrow, keep calm.
Evening—you asked for it—has come.
Darkening streets (depending who you are)
bring peace, or fear.

While party-goers, hectic, head
for their own idiot after-misery,
take my hand.
Come with me.

See how, in tatters, the gone
years lean down;
from the river, smiling, Regret

rises. Below a bridge, the tired sun sets,
and—trailing a foggy shroud, my dear, with light
steps (Listen!):   Night.

Jeredith Merrin is author of CUP, a special honoree in the Able Muse poetry competition. Her collections Shift and Bat Ode appeared in the University of Chicago Press Phoenix Poets series. Her reviews and essays (on Moore, Bishop, Clare, Mew, Amichai, and others) have appeared in The Southern Review and elsewhere.
Originally published:
October 1, 2018

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